Public Domain Treaty Compliance Verification in the Digital Age

Public Domain Treaty Compliance Verification in the Digital Age
T&S Paper by Christopher W. Stubbs and Sidney D. Drell; Winter 2013

Abstract: We explore in this article some of the emerging opportunities, and associated challenges, that the digital age offers for public-domain verification of compliance with international treaties. The increase in data volume, in ever-improving connectivity, and the relentless evolution towards ubiquitous sensors all provide a rapidly changing landscape for technical compliance verification of international treaties. From satellites to cell phones, advances in technology afford new opportunities for verifying compliance with international agreements, on topics ranging from arms control to environmental and public health issues. We will identify some of the engineering challenges that must be overcome in order to realize these new verification opportunities.

Public Open Sensor Data: Revolutionizing Smart Cities

Public Open Sensor Data: Revolutionizing Smart Cities
T&S Paper by Albert Domingo, Boris Bellalta, Manuel Palacin, Miquel Oliver, and Esteve Almirall; Winter 2013

Abstract: Local governments have decided to take advantage of the presence of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in their cities to efficiently manage several applications in their daily responsibilities. The enormous amount of information collected by sensor devices allows the automation of several real-time services to improve city management by using intelligent traffic-light patterns during rush hour, reducing water consumption in parks, or efficiently routing garbage collection trucks throughout the city [1]. The sensor information required by these examples is mostly self-consumed by city-designed applications and managers.

Comparing British and Japanese Perceptions of a Wearable Ubiquitous Monitoring Device

Comparing British and Japanese Perceptions of a Wearable Ubiquitous Monitoring Device
T&S Paper by Stuart Moran, Toyoaki Nishida, and Keiichi Nakata Winter 2013
Mixed Reality Lab., Univ. Nottingham, Nottingham, UK

Abstract: Ubiquitous Monitoring (UM) describes the continuous collection of data on a large scale, enabled by embedded, mobile, wireless, and sensory technologies. This data will enable the envisioned applications of Ubiquitous Computing. Research has shown that monitoring can affect user behavior , which is problematic for ubiquitous computing because the data collected may not fully reflect the reality. Hence, any services provided may not fully align with user expectations or needs. One proposed solution is the use of deterministic models to predict the behaviors of users prior to deployment, reducing the undesirable effects of monitoring. The Perceptions of System Attributes-Behavioral Intention (PSA-BI) model was specifically designed for this purpose [1]. While the model has been validated, the moderating effect of culture has not yet been explored. As such, we present here results from a study carried out in the U.K. exploring the relationships in the PSA-BI model. This is then compared with a structural model from a previous study in Japan, allowing us to explore any potential differences and similarities.

Abstract-IEEE ISTAS 13

Early in the 21st Century, Intelligence will Underlie Everything of Value

Ray Kurzweil KurzweilAI, United States

At the onset of the 21st century, it will be an era in which the very nature of what it means to be human will be both enriched and challenged, as our species breaks the shackles of its genetic legacy, and achieves inconceivable heights of intelligence, material progress, and longevity. The paradigm shift rate is now doubling every decade, so the twenty-first century will see 20,000 years of progress at today’s rate. Computation, communication, biological technologies (for example, DNA sequencing), brain scanning, knowledge of the human brain, and human knowledge in general are all accelerating at an even faster pace, generally doubling price-performance, capacity, and bandwidth every year. Three-dimensional molecular computing will provide the hardware for human-level “strong” AI well before 2030. The more important software insights will be gained in part from the reverse-engineering of the human brain, a process well under way. While the social and philosophical ramifications of these changes will be profound, and the threats they pose considerable, we will ultimately merge with our machines, live indefinitely, and be a billion times more intelligent…all within the next three to four decades.

Keywords: intelligence innovation brain society philosophy computation communication biology human