Is RFID Getting Under Your Skin?

Technology & Society has touched on this a few times… RFID implants in people.  WSJ has an update worth noting. My new car uses RFID chips to open doors and start the ignition.  Having these “embedded” could be of value… but what if I buy a different car?   The article lists electronic locks as one application, and also embedding medical history, contact information, etc.   Your “RFID” constellation (credit cards, ID cards, keys, etc.) can identify you uniquely — for example as you enter a store, etc.  So the ‘relationship’ between your RFID and the intended devices goes beyond that one-to-one application.

An ethical issue raised was that of consent associated with embedding RFID in a person who may not be able to provide consent, but would benefit from the ID potential, lock access (or denial), etc.  An obvious example is tracking a dementia patient if they leave the facility.  Of course we already put on wrist bands that are difficult to remove, and these might contain RFID or other locating devices.

What applications might cause you to embed a device under your skin? What concerns do you have about possible problems/issues?

IEEE T&S Magazine, June 2016

COVER JUNE 16 LR

VOL. 35, NO. 2, JUNE 2016

SPECIAL SECTION—Rise of the Robots:
Technology and Social Disruption

Departments

President’s Message
3 Do We Just “Build Stuff”?icon.access.free
Greg Adamson

Call for Papersicon.access.free
4 ISTAS 2017 — Kerala, India

Editorial
5 When Uber Cars Become Driverless: “They Won’t Need No Driver”icon.access.free
Katina Michael

In Memoriamtoc thumbnail minsky
11 Marvin Minsky 1927–2016icon.access.free
David Brin

Book Reviewsicon.access.free
12 Perfecting Sound
15 America’s Assembly Line
18 Rise of the Robots
20 The Cybernetics Moment
23 Military Robots: Mapping the Moral Landscape
25 Digital Militarism

Leading Edge
29 When Smart Is Not: Technology and Michio Kaku’s The Future of the Mindicon.access.free
Jeff Robbins

Commentary
28 Social Network Neutrality, Anyone?icon.access.free
Nicholas Paul Sheppard
32 RFID Implant Developments: Where are We Headed and Why?icon.access.free
Sharon Rose Bradley-Munn
86 Are Technologies Innocent? Part Three: The Passive Instrument Argument*icon.access.locked
Michael Arnold and Christopher Pearce

Ethical Dilemmas
34 GM Ignition Switch Recall: Too Little Too Late?icon.access.free
Karl Stephan
36 Toyota: Not So Fast, Guysicon.access.free
Karl Stephan

Opinion
38 Uber Is Built on Trusticon.access.free
Chris MacDonald

News and Notes
39 ISTAS 2016: An Update

Last Word
88 Militarized Zonesicon.access.free
Christine Perakslis

SPECIAL SECTION FEATURES

40_ Will My Next Car Be a Libertarian or a Utilitarian? Who Will Decide?*icon.access.locked
Tom Fourniercrop sample

 

46_ Sex Robot Matters — Slavery, the Prostituted, and the Rights of Machines*icon.access.lockedcopy of image to be used with sex robots article
Kathleen Richardson

 

 

54_ Robot Enhanced Therapy for Children with Autism Disorders: Measuring Ethical Acceptability*icon.access.locked
Andreea Peca, Mark Coeckelbergh, Ramona Simut, Cristina Costescu, Sebastian Pintea, Daniel David, and Bram Vanderborght

67_ Flying Ad-Hoc Networks: Technological and Social Implications*icon.access.lockededitorial thumbnail drones
Wajiya Zafar and Bilal Muhammad Khan

 

FEATURE

75_ Privacy Policy Analysis of Popular Web Platforms*icon.access.locked
Stephanie Winkler and Sherali Zeadally

* Refereed articles.

If the Computer Said it, it must be True!

Well, maybe not.  “What Happens When GPS Can’t Find You?” is a commercial concern raised by a Wall St. Journal article.  Needless to say a business in today’s world is at risk if the GPS location associated with it is wrong, or just the path that is required to get there is not correct.  Consumers at best are frustrated, and may simply write off that operation.  In this case it is often not the business’s fault, but one in the GPS location service, or route mapping.

Behind this is a more pervasive and serious problem.  Often there is no way to “fix” these problems from the perspective of the consumer or the an affected business.  You may know the data is wrong, the route doesn’t work, and correcting the error(s) is not a straight forward path, and certainly not easy enough that the “crowd-source” solution would work. That is, many people might find the error, and if there were a simple way to “report” the problem, after the “nth” report, an automated fix (or review) could be triggered.

This is not just  GPS problem. I’ve found many web sites are validating addresses against equally flawed sources (perhaps even the USPS).  I can send mail to my daughter (and she gets it), I’ve even seen the mailbox on the side of her street. By one of the web sites I used to deliver items to her location is rejecting the address as “not known”… and of course there is no way to report the error. A related problem is entering an address in “just the right way” — am I in “Unit A101” or “Apt. A 101″ or maybe Apt A101”, note that the delivery folks can handle all of these, but the online ordering system can’t.  Technology design consideration: track such ‘failures’, and after some number, check the validation process, or better have a button such as “I know this is right, so please update the database”.

Online operations are losing business, as well as brick-and-mortar activities due to online “presumptions” of correctness .. and no corrective processes available.  It’s one thing when the word processor marks your spelling as “wrong”, but lets you keep it anyway.  It is another when medications or essential services can’t reach your location because the GPS or delivery address is not in the database, or is listed incorrectly.

T&S Magazine September 2015 Contents

cover 1

Volume 34, Number 3, September 2015

4 President’s Message
Coping with Machines
Greg Adamson
Book Reviews
5 Marketing the Moon: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Mission
7 Alan Turing: The Enigma
10 Editorial
Resistance is Not Futile, nil desperandum
MG Michael and Katina Michael
13 Letter to the Editor
Technology and Change
Kevin Hu
14 Opinion
Privacy Nightmare: When Baby Monitors Go Bad
Katherine Albrecht and Liz Mcintyre
15 From the Editor’s Desk
Robots Don’t Pray
Eugenio Guglielmelli
17 Leading Edge
Unmanned Aircraft: The Rising Risk of Hostile Takeover
Donna A. Dulo
20 Opinion
Automatic Tyranny, Re-Theism, and the Rise of the Reals
Sand Sheff
23 Creating “The Norbert Wiener Media Project”
J. Mitchell Johnson
25 Interview
A Conversation with Lazar Puhalo
88 Last Word
Technological Expeditions and Cognitive Indolence
Christine Perakslis

SPECIAL ISSUE: Norbert Wiener in the 21st Century

33_ Guest Editorial
Philip Hall, Heather A. Love and Shiro Uesugi
35_ Norbert Wiener: Odd Man Ahead
Mary Catherine Bateson
37_ The Next Macy Conference: A New Interdisciplinary Synthesis
Andrew Pickering
39_ Ubiquitous Surveillance and Security
Bruce Schneier
41_ Reintroducing Wiener: Channeling Norbert in the 21st Century
Flo Conway and Jim Siegelman
44_ Securing the Exocortex*
Tamara Bonaci, Jeffrey Herron, Charles Matlack, and Howard Jay Chizeck
52_ Wiener’s Prefiguring of a Cybernetic Design Theory*
Thomas Fischer
60_ Norbert Wiener and the Counter-Tradition to the Dream of Mastery
D. Hill
64_ Down the Rabbit Hole*
Laura Moorhead

Features

74_ Opening Pandora’s 3D Printed Box
Phillip Olla
81_ Application Areas of Additive Manufacturing
N.J.R. Venekamp and H.Th. Le Fever

*Refereed article.

T&S Magazine June 2015 Contents

cover 1

Volume 34, Number 2, June 2015

3 ISTAS 2015 – Dublin
4 President’s Message
Deterministic and Statistical Worlds
Greg Adamson
5 Editorial
Mental Health, Implantables, and Side Effects
Katina Michael
8 Book Reviews
Reality Check: How Science Deniers Threaten Our Future
Stealing Cars: Technology & Society from the Model T to the Gran Torino
13 Leading Edge
“Ich liebe Dich UBER alles in der Welt” (I love you more than anything else in the world)
Sally Applin
Opinion
16 Tools for the Vision Impaired
Molly Hartman
18 Learning from Delusions
Brian Martin
21 Commentary
Nanoelectronics Research Gaps and Recommendations*
Kosmas Galatsis, Paolo Gargini, Toshiro Hiramoto, Dirk Beernaert, Roger DeKeersmaecker, Joachim Pelka, and Lothar Pfitzner
80 Last Word
Father’s Day Algorithms or Malgorithms?
Christine Perakslis

SPECIAL ISSUE—Ethics 2014/ISTAS 2014

31_ Guest Editorial
Keith Miller and Joe Herkert
32_ App Stores for the Brain: Privacy and Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces*
Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo, and Howard Jay Chizeck
40_ The Internet Census 2012 Dataset: An Ethical Examination*
David Dittrich, Katherine Carpenter, and Manish Karir
47_ Technology as Moral Proxy: Autonomy and Paternalism by Design*
Jason Millar
56_ Teaching Engineering Ethics: A Phenomenological Approach*
Valorie Troesch
64_ Informed Consent for Deep Brain Stimulation: Increasing Transparency for Psychiatric Neurosurgery Patients*
Andrew Koivuniemi
71_ Robotic Prosthetics: Moving Beyond Technical Performance*
N. Jarrassé, M. Maestrutti, G. Morel, and A. Roby-Brami

*Refereed Articles

 

Police Cameras

My daughter is attending a citizen police academy. They discussed the challenges that police cameras (body, squad car, interview rooms, traffic monitoring, etc.) present — and these related, in part, to the objectives of having such cameras.

1) When an officer is apprehending a suspect, a video of the sequence covers a topic that is very likely to be raised in court (in the  U.S. where fairly specific procedures need to be followed during an arrest.)  Evidence related to this has to follow very specific rules to be admissible.  An example of this concept is in the Fort Collins Colorado police FAQ where they provide some specifics. This process requires managed documentation trails by qualified experts to assure the evidence can be used.  There are real expenses here beyond just having a camera and streaming/or transferring the sequences to the web. Web storage has been created that is designed to facilitate this management challenge. Note that even if the prosecution does not wish to use this material, the defense may do so, and if it is not managed correctly, seek that charges be dismissed. (For culture’s where defendants are not innocent until proven guilty and/or there is not a body of case or statutory defendants rights this may sound odd, but in the U.S. it is possible for a blatantly guilty perpetrator to have charges against him dropped due to a failure to respect his rights.)

2) There are situations where a police officer is suspected of criminal actions. For real time situations (like those in the news recently), the same defendants rights need to be respected for the officer(s) involved. Again close management is needed.

Note that in these cases, there are clear criminal activities that the police suspect at the time when the video is captured, and managing the ‘trail of evidence’ is a well defined activity with a cost and benefit that is not present without the cameras.

The vast majority of recorded data does not require the chain-of-evidence treatment. If a proper request for specific data not associated with an arrest results in data that is used in court, it is most likely to be by a defendant, and the prosecutor is unlikely to challenge the validity of the data since it deprecates their own system.

Of course there are other potential uses of the data.  It might contain information relevant to a divorce actions (the couple in the car stopped for the ticket – one’s spouse wants to know why the other person was in the car); or the images of bystanders at a site might impact the apparent privacy of such persons. (Although in general no right of privacy is recognized in the U.S. for persons in public.)

The Seattle police are putting some video on YouTube, after applying automated redaction software to protect the privacy of individuals captured in the frame. Just the presence of the video cameras can reduce both use of force and citizen complaints.

There are clearly situations where either the police, or the citizens involved, or both would find a video recording to be of value, even if it did not meet evidentiary rules.  Of course the concern related to such rules is the potential for in-appropriate editing of the video to transform it from an “objective” witness to bias it in one direction or another.

We have the technology— should we use it?  An opinion piece by Jay Stanley in SSIT’s Technology and Society journal outlines some of these issues in more detail.

T&S Magazine March 2015 Contents

LOW RES T&S March 2015 cover 1

Volume 34, Number 1, March 2015

Special Section on Social and Economic Sustainability

18 GUEST EDITORIAL Jason Sargent, Khanjan Mehta, and Katina Michael

20 Long-Distance Telecommunication in Remote, Poor Areas* Martin J. Murillo, Juan A. Paco, and David Wright

31 Integrated Energy Resources Planning for the Electricity Sector: Targeting Sustainable Development Miguel Edgar Morales Udaeta, Flavio Minoru Maruyama, Andre Luiz Veiga Gimenes, and Luiz Cláudio Ribeiro Galvão

39 The Role of ICT in a Low Carbon Society Michael Koenigsmayr and Thomas Neubauer

45 RFID Individual Tracking and Records Management – Solutions for Slum Communities* Ali Zalzala, Vivienne Strettle, Stanley Chia, and Laura Zalzala

FEATURES

56 An Anticipatory Social Assessment of Factory-Grown Meat* Carolyn S. Mattick, Jameson M. Wetmore, and Braden R. Allenby

65 Resolving Multiplexed Automotive Communications: Applied Agency and the Social Car* Sally A. Applin and Michael D. Fischer

74 Mobile Technology for Socio-Religious Events – A Case Study of NFC Technology* Mohamed Ahmed Mohandes  

DEPARTMENTS

Inside Front Cover ISTAS 2015 – Culture, Ethics, and the Knowledge Society Call for Papers

4 President’s Message SSIT Past and Future Greg Adamson

5 Book Review The Circle

Opinion

7 Ruminations on the “IQ2 Debate: We Are Becoming Enslaved by Our Technology” Jeff Robbins

9 Are Social Media Making Us Stupid? Liz Stillwaggon Swan and Louis J. Goldberg

11 Commentary Considering Social Implications of Biometric Registration – A Database Intended for Every Citizen in India Usha Ramanathan

80 Last Word Lessons from the Sea Christine Perakslis

*Refereed article.

Cover Image: ISTOCK.

EPIC2015 – Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference

Of potential interest to the SSIT Community:
São Paulo, Brazil, October 5-8, 2015
http://epicpeople.org/2015

EPIC is the premier international gathering on the current and future practice of ethnography and design in the business world.

Call for Participation
http://epicpeople.org/2015/call-for-participation/

EPIC2015 explores Building Bridges–the diverse connections among people, places, industries, and disciplines at the heart of ethnographic praxis. The EPIC 2015 program committee welcomes submissions of Paper
Abstracts, Pecha-Kucha Abstracts, and Tutorial Proposals that present original work in the areas of ethnography and design. They may focus on methodological, theoretical,
and business challenges, and opportunities offered in empirical studies.

Important Dates
Submission deadline – March 6, 2015
Acceptance notification – April 13, 2015
Final Submission – September 15, 2015

Computer Consiousness

Christof Koch in an interview with MIT’s Technology Review suggests that computer consciousness is a matter of complexity, and perhaps the way that complexity is implemented.

With the recently released movie on Alan Turing (The Imitation Game) , the public is, once again, exposed to the basic concept … and Turing’s insight that “if it interacts like an intelligent, conscious being, then maybe it is one.”   A more ironic concept since the movie pushes Turing a bit further on the autistic scale than is likely — and causes the attentive audience to ask if Turing is conscious (he clearly is intelligent.)

This concept is often confused with the question of “what makes us human” or “how do we know that other entity is human?” … which is not “is conscious?”  or “is intelligent”. A WSJ column “Why Digital Gurus Get Lost in the ‘Uncanny Valley‘” touches on this, pointing out that we use a number of unconscious clues to make this decision.  (Also why Pixel hires folks with acting backgrounds.)

There is a danger here.  If we judge these characteristics by certain clues — like the angle of a dog’s head, the big eyes, (eyes are significant here) .. and so forth, we may dismiss intelligent/conscious entities who fail our (unconscious?) tests.   Of course they may fail to recognize us as having these characteristics for parallel reasons.

The good news is that our current primary path for detecting intelligent life is with SETI, and since all of those communications are very “Imitation Game” like, we won’t have the chance to mess it up with our “Uncanny Valley” presumptions.