“Remaining Human”

CLICK HERE for the must-watch short film:

VIMEO.COM|BY J.MITCHELLJOHNSON
 
produced with a small IEEE grant on the work of Norbert Wiener.
Launched October 21, 2016, at the IEEE ISTAS 2016 conference in Kerala, India. EXCLUSIVE. #norbert#wiener #cybernetics #communications #ethics #feedback #brain#machines #automation

For more see www.norbertwiener.org and www.norbertwiener.com

 

T&S Magazine December 2015

cover dec 15

IEEE Technology and Society Magazine

Volume 34, Number 4, December 2015

Departments

President’s Message
3 Improving Our “Engineering-Crazed” Image
Greg Adamson

Book Reviews
4 Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks
6 Faxed: The Rise and Fall of the Fax Machine

Editorial
9 Reflecting on the Contribution of T&S Magazine to the IEEE
Katina Michael

Open Letter
15 Technology and Change

Interview
16 On the Road with Rick Sare… and Google Glass

Viewpoint
17 Shakespeare, Social Media and Social Networks
Fernando A. Crespo, Sigifredo Laengle, Paula Baldwin Lind and Víctor Hugo Masías

Leading Edge
20 Corporate Individualism – Changing the Face of Capitalism
László G. Lovászy

23 Multimedia and Gaming Technologies for Telerehabilitation of Motor Disabilities
Andrea Proietti, Marco Paoloni, Massimo Panella, Luca Liparulo and Rosa Altilio

31 MoodTrek – A New App to Improve Mental HealthCare
Ganesh Gopalakrishna and Srivam Chellappan

33 Alternative Planning and Land Administration for Future Smart Cities
Soheil Sabri, Abbas Rajabifard, Serene Ho, Mohammad-Reza Namazi-Rad, and Christopher Pettit

Commentary
36 Pharmaco-Electronics Emerge
Joseph R. Carvalko

41 Blockchain Thinking*
Melanie Swan

63 Information Paradox*
Levent V. Orman

Fiction
54 Held Captive in the Cyberworld
Michael Eldred

Last Word
104 Digitus Secundus: The Swipe
Christine Perakslis

Features
74_ The Value of Accountability in the Cloud*
Wouter M.P. Steijn and Maartje G.H. Niezen

83_ Shaping Our Technological Futures*
Reihana Mohideen and Rob Evans

88_ Driver Distraction from Dashboard and Wearable Interfaces*
Robert Rosenberger

100_ Are Technologies Innocent?*
Michael Arnold and Christopher Pearce

*Refereed articles.

On the cover: Blockchain Thinking. English Wikipedia/The Opte Project/Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

ISTAS ’15 Dublin – Irish President Michael Higgins Delivers Opening Address

President_Higgins_151111_02491

SSIT was honored with an opening address from Michael D. Higgins, President of Ireland, at the 2015 IEEE-SSIT International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS ‘15) on November 11 in Dublin, Ireland. It is the first time a head of state has addressed an ISTAS event. Full coverage of the conference will appear in the January 2016 SSIT e-newsletter and on line at ieeessit.org. The President’s remarks will be published in the March 2016 issue of T&S Magazine. A Special Issue on ISTAS ‘15 will appear in the September 2016 issue of T&S, and will be guest edited by ISTAS ‘15 conference chair, Paul Cunningham.

 

T&S Magazine September 2015 Contents

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Volume 34, Number 3, September 2015

4 President’s Message
Coping with Machines
Greg Adamson
Book Reviews
5 Marketing the Moon: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Mission
7 Alan Turing: The Enigma
10 Editorial
Resistance is Not Futile, nil desperandum
MG Michael and Katina Michael
13 Letter to the Editor
Technology and Change
Kevin Hu
14 Opinion
Privacy Nightmare: When Baby Monitors Go Bad
Katherine Albrecht and Liz Mcintyre
15 From the Editor’s Desk
Robots Don’t Pray
Eugenio Guglielmelli
17 Leading Edge
Unmanned Aircraft: The Rising Risk of Hostile Takeover
Donna A. Dulo
20 Opinion
Automatic Tyranny, Re-Theism, and the Rise of the Reals
Sand Sheff
23 Creating “The Norbert Wiener Media Project”
J. Mitchell Johnson
25 Interview
A Conversation with Lazar Puhalo
88 Last Word
Technological Expeditions and Cognitive Indolence
Christine Perakslis

SPECIAL ISSUE: Norbert Wiener in the 21st Century

33_ Guest Editorial
Philip Hall, Heather A. Love and Shiro Uesugi
35_ Norbert Wiener: Odd Man Ahead
Mary Catherine Bateson
37_ The Next Macy Conference: A New Interdisciplinary Synthesis
Andrew Pickering
39_ Ubiquitous Surveillance and Security
Bruce Schneier
41_ Reintroducing Wiener: Channeling Norbert in the 21st Century
Flo Conway and Jim Siegelman
44_ Securing the Exocortex*
Tamara Bonaci, Jeffrey Herron, Charles Matlack, and Howard Jay Chizeck
52_ Wiener’s Prefiguring of a Cybernetic Design Theory*
Thomas Fischer
60_ Norbert Wiener and the Counter-Tradition to the Dream of Mastery
D. Hill
64_ Down the Rabbit Hole*
Laura Moorhead

Features

74_ Opening Pandora’s 3D Printed Box
Phillip Olla
81_ Application Areas of Additive Manufacturing
N.J.R. Venekamp and H.Th. Le Fever

*Refereed article.

T&S Magazine June 2015 Contents

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Volume 34, Number 2, June 2015

3 ISTAS 2015 – Dublin
4 President’s Message
Deterministic and Statistical Worlds
Greg Adamson
5 Editorial
Mental Health, Implantables, and Side Effects
Katina Michael
8 Book Reviews
Reality Check: How Science Deniers Threaten Our Future
Stealing Cars: Technology & Society from the Model T to the Gran Torino
13 Leading Edge
“Ich liebe Dich UBER alles in der Welt” (I love you more than anything else in the world)
Sally Applin
Opinion
16 Tools for the Vision Impaired
Molly Hartman
18 Learning from Delusions
Brian Martin
21 Commentary
Nanoelectronics Research Gaps and Recommendations*
Kosmas Galatsis, Paolo Gargini, Toshiro Hiramoto, Dirk Beernaert, Roger DeKeersmaecker, Joachim Pelka, and Lothar Pfitzner
80 Last Word
Father’s Day Algorithms or Malgorithms?
Christine Perakslis

SPECIAL ISSUE—Ethics 2014/ISTAS 2014

31_ Guest Editorial
Keith Miller and Joe Herkert
32_ App Stores for the Brain: Privacy and Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces*
Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo, and Howard Jay Chizeck
40_ The Internet Census 2012 Dataset: An Ethical Examination*
David Dittrich, Katherine Carpenter, and Manish Karir
47_ Technology as Moral Proxy: Autonomy and Paternalism by Design*
Jason Millar
56_ Teaching Engineering Ethics: A Phenomenological Approach*
Valorie Troesch
64_ Informed Consent for Deep Brain Stimulation: Increasing Transparency for Psychiatric Neurosurgery Patients*
Andrew Koivuniemi
71_ Robotic Prosthetics: Moving Beyond Technical Performance*
N. Jarrassé, M. Maestrutti, G. Morel, and A. Roby-Brami

*Refereed Articles

 

Humans in a Post Employment World?

There are many sources suggesting that productivity (including robotics and A.I. interfaces) will increase enough to have a significant impact on future employment world wide.   This includes:

Geoff Colvin, in his new ‘underrated’ book suggests that even in a world where most if not all jobs can be done by robots, humans are social animals and will prefer human interactions in some situations.  The Atlantic, focuses on what the future may include for jobless persons when that is the norm.  “The Jobless don’t spend their time socializing or taking up new hobbies. Instead they watch TV or sleep.”  A disturbing vision of a world which currently includes, according to this article, 16% of American men ages 25-54.  The article did not discuss the potential for younger men who see limited future opportunity to turn to socially problematic activities from crime and drugs to radicalization and revolution.

As with any challenge, the first step is recognizing there is a problem. This may be more difficult in the U.S. where work is equated with status, personal identity (“I am a <job title here>”), and social responsibility.  One suggestion is the creation of civic centers where folks can get together and “meet, learn skills, bond around sports or crafts, and socialize.” These might be combined with maker-spaces and start-up incubators that become a catalyst for creator-consumer-funder collaborations.

So — what’s your future “job” — will you be in the “on-demand” economy?  Perhaps engaging in the maker-world? — How might this future differ in various countries? Will Europe or India or ?? yield different responses to a situation that is expected to affect global economies over this century?

T&S Magazine March 2015 Contents

LOW RES T&S March 2015 cover 1

Volume 34, Number 1, March 2015

Special Section on Social and Economic Sustainability

18 GUEST EDITORIAL Jason Sargent, Khanjan Mehta, and Katina Michael

20 Long-Distance Telecommunication in Remote, Poor Areas* Martin J. Murillo, Juan A. Paco, and David Wright

31 Integrated Energy Resources Planning for the Electricity Sector: Targeting Sustainable Development Miguel Edgar Morales Udaeta, Flavio Minoru Maruyama, Andre Luiz Veiga Gimenes, and Luiz Cláudio Ribeiro Galvão

39 The Role of ICT in a Low Carbon Society Michael Koenigsmayr and Thomas Neubauer

45 RFID Individual Tracking and Records Management – Solutions for Slum Communities* Ali Zalzala, Vivienne Strettle, Stanley Chia, and Laura Zalzala

FEATURES

56 An Anticipatory Social Assessment of Factory-Grown Meat* Carolyn S. Mattick, Jameson M. Wetmore, and Braden R. Allenby

65 Resolving Multiplexed Automotive Communications: Applied Agency and the Social Car* Sally A. Applin and Michael D. Fischer

74 Mobile Technology for Socio-Religious Events – A Case Study of NFC Technology* Mohamed Ahmed Mohandes  

DEPARTMENTS

Inside Front Cover ISTAS 2015 – Culture, Ethics, and the Knowledge Society Call for Papers

4 President’s Message SSIT Past and Future Greg Adamson

5 Book Review The Circle

Opinion

7 Ruminations on the “IQ2 Debate: We Are Becoming Enslaved by Our Technology” Jeff Robbins

9 Are Social Media Making Us Stupid? Liz Stillwaggon Swan and Louis J. Goldberg

11 Commentary Considering Social Implications of Biometric Registration – A Database Intended for Every Citizen in India Usha Ramanathan

80 Last Word Lessons from the Sea Christine Perakslis

*Refereed article.

Cover Image: ISTOCK.

T&S Magazine Winter 2014 Contents

T&S Winter 2014 cover low res

VOL. 33, NO. 4, WINTER 2014

DEPARTMENTS
4 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
Dear SSIT Members…
Laura Jacob

5 EDITORIAL
Enslaved
Katina Michael

9 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Enslavement by Technology? Reflections on the IQ2 Debate on Big Ideas

11 OPINION
Are we Enslaved by Technology?
Michael Eldred

12 LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Excessive Conference Fees

13 BOOK REVIEWS
Lonely Ideas: Can Russia Compete?
Hedy’s Folly: The Life and Breakthrough inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World
User Unfriendly

21 OPINION
Remotely Piloted Airborne Vehicles
Philip Hall

22 COMMENTARY
Recommendations for Future Development of Artificial Agents
Deborah G. Johnson and Merel Noorman

29 COMMENTARY
Channeling Digital Convergence in Education for Societal Benefit
Arturo Serrano-Santoyo and Mayer R. Cabrera-Flores

32 TRENDS
Influential Engineers: Where Do They Come From and Where Do They Go?
J. Panaretos and C.C. Malesios

35 LEADING EDGE
Videoconferencing for Civil Commitment: Preserving Dignity
Muaid Ithman, Ganesh Gopalakrishna, Bruce Harry, and Deepti Bahl

37 COMMENTARY
Snowden’s Lessons for Whistleblowers
Brian Martin

39 OPINION
How and Why to Keep the NSA Out of Your Private Stuff – Even If You’ve “Got Nothing to Hide”
Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre

42 LEADING EDGE
Using Data to Combat Human Rights Abuses
Felicity Gerry

 FEATURES

44 Leaning on the Ethical Crutch: A Critique of Codes of Ethics*
Jathan Sadowski

48 User Understanding of Privacy in Emerging Mobile Markets*
Cormac Callanan and Borka Jerman-Blazic

57 Questioning Professional Autonomy in Qualitative Inquiry*
R. Varma

65 Cell Phone Use While Driving: Risk Implications for Organizations*
S. Yang and R. Parry

73 Building Trust in the Human—Internet of Things Relationship*
Ioannis Kounelis, Gianmarco Baldini, Ricardo Neisse, Gary Steri, Mariachiara Tallacchini, and Ângela Guimarães Pereira

*Refereed articles.

Cover Image: ISTOCK.

Who’s flying this drone?

Looking out for humankind as intelligent technologies take charge

Guest Blog post by Jeanne Dietsch, Founder, Sapiens Plurum.

Until recently, I was an unmitigated technophile. Back in 1980, just after the first Apple PC was introduced, I tried to write a thesis on “The Future of the Computer as a Mass Medium.” My Master’s committee unanimously declared that such a thing would never occur. Two tech start-ups later, I was jeered onstage by London telecom executives because I predicted that Internet commerce would grow by 1000% over the next 5 years. And indeed I was wrong… on the low side.

More and more futurists now find themselves on the conservative side of reality. Consider these startling examples of actuality exceeding expectation: 1) Researchers stunned their compatriots by “solving” Texas Hold’em Poker, including probabilistic reasoning and bluffing strategies. Software cued with nothing but the rules of the game and monetary loss aversion became unbeatable by playing more hands of poker during two years than all humankind throughout the history of the game. Michael Bowling and colleagues now expect to optimize any constrained process with a clear outcome in the same massively parallel manner. 2) Researchers at the University of Washington can now play videogames telepathically. Using off-the-shelf tech, a videogame viewer controls a viewless player’s hand just by thinking about it. And Washington insiders hint US DoD has been performing similar studies for some time. 3) Nanobots will actually be tested this year to find and destroy cancerous cells and repair damaged ones. Projections that such minute machines would collaborate to keep us alive “forever” previously lay in the distant mists.

Since I sold our intelligent robotics start-up in 2010, I have been studying the accelerating evolution of technology. The tectonic tremors building up alarm not only me, but physicist Stephen Hawking, inventor Elon Musk, MIT professor Max Tegmark and thousands of others who signed Max’s open letter Research Priorities for Robust and Beneficial Artificial Intelligence. And it is not just AI, but its combination with other radical advances that portends vast, almost unimaginable change… and benefits. The question, as always, is: benefits for whom? Who’s driving this drone and where is it headed?

We know that military, political and economic gain will set its course unless someone creates a vision with loftier goals. Our challenge, then, is how to intervene to keep humankind, and human kindness, in the pilot’s seat, and piloting software. This is the reason I started Sapiens Plurum (the wisdom of many). Sapiens Plurum advocates for the interests of humankind in a world of increasingly powerful technology. The strategy behind Sapiens Plurum and Sapiens Plurum News assumes that any top-down policy consensus will be too little, too late, and largely unenforceable. By instead working to educate the general public, in particular, the young, we hope to create a demand-side force that will create bottom-up norms for humane and human-enhancing technologies. Hence, our priorities are to:

  1. Help people understand the potential impact of rising technologies on their lives
  2. Encourage people to choose technologies that put them in control to improve our lives
  3. Advocate for technologies that benefit humankind rather than exploit them

Can you help us by disseminating awareness at your organization or joining ours? We are seeking volunteer regional leaders and board members at SapiensPlurum.org.

About the Author: Jeanne Dietsch was founder and CEO of MobileRobots Inc. She served on the IEEE Industrial Activities Board of RAS 2007-2011 and wrote a column for IEEE Robotics & Automation magazine 2009-2012. She is a Harvard graduate in sci-tech policy, a group-thinking facilitator and founder of Sapiens Plurum, an advocacy organization looking out for the interests of humankind.

ISTAS 2015 – Nov 11, 12; Dublin Ireland

The International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS), held annually.

Papers (5,000 – 6,000 words) using the ISTAS2015 Template must be registered on the conference portal by the deadline of 31 May 2015.  Workshop proposals have a 8 June 2015 deadline (see site for details)